Backdating effective date contract

The contract date is usually written onto the front cover and the first page of the contract (although there is no legal requirement to do so).

Generally this is the date that the last party signed the contract.

These generally include: The ‘contract date’ is the date often written on the cover or last page of the contract.

The ‘signature date’ is, unsurprisingly, the date written next to or below the signature of each party, showing the date they signed the contract.

This date is usually the date which both parties consider to be the date the contract was made and became effective, unless there is a different defined ‘Effective Date’ or ‘Commencement Date’.

If there is a date at the beginning of the contract which is not the date of the last signature this can lead to confusion or be of no effect in interpreting when the contract actually began.

However, there has been some controversial English case law suggesting that, in some circumstances, contracts and deeds executed virtually may not be enforceable."Simple contracts and deeds are often executed in counterparts.

Backdating, by definition, is the practice of putting a calendar date on any document that is earlier than the date on which that document was actually written.

Most insurers will allow up to six months of backdating.It seems simple, but which date to write on a contract, and how to interpret the dates often raises some fiddly.There are a number of dates which can appear within contracts.Contracts can also, confusingly, contain defined dates such as ‘commencement date’, ‘effective date’ or ‘start date’.These dates indicate when the contract or parts of it are due to have legal effect, if these dates are different to the contract and/or signature dates.

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