Scientific problems with carbon dating

Knowing that C14 degrades into nitrogen at a known rate and organisms do not take in C14 once they’re dead, then it logically follows that the presence of C14 in a dead organism will decrease over time.

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When an organism dies, it obviously no longer eats, photosynthesizes, etc.

-C14 concentrations exist in all parts of the biosphere. -There has been complete and rapid mixing of C14 throughout the various carbon reservoirs on a worldwide basis. All these assumptions can be summarized as follows: 1) C14 production in the atmosphere is constant.

-The death of a plant or animal, is the point at which it no longer exchanges C14 with the environment. -Carbon isotope ratios have not been altered except by that of C14 decay. 2) C14 rapidly mixes and is spread evenly throughout the biosphere. 6) C14 decay rates and formation rates are in equilibrium.

Yet, as simple and straightforward as this seems, the process of dating objects via radiocarbon is far from simple and straightforward.

Here I will present what radiocarbon is, the dating methods, the assumptions that govern them, and the known discrepancies that plague the method.

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